“Could you call me Cordelia?”

Such was the plea of literary character, Anne of Green Gables, who disliked her plain name and was often in “the depths of despair”.

Anne of Green Gables

I’m not quite in “the depths” (it takes lack of sunshine and being out of ice cream to put me there), but I do get nervous when it comes to naming.  After all, bad name-related things can happen to anyone, in real life and in literature .   Kevin Henke’s loveable mouse, Chrysanthemum, who had always basked in her moniker, had a crisis when she went to school.

Who knew kindergarten mice could be so cruel?

I perhaps do more naming than the average person, although I don’t have children or pets.  I write children’s stories (lots of loaded naming decisions there) and disguise my friends’ names for this blog (lots of amusing naming decisions there) and I have a mini collection of vintage vehicles.   A vintage vehicle has such personality that I think it just naturally begs for a name.

If you think that’s ridiculous, remember, I have named derelict buildings that have tried to kill me and that I’ve known for a mere 30 seconds, too.

So, name the vehicles, I do.  Even though, there are some that advise against it.  They seem to think that

  1. it’s tacky and low-brow, or
  2. it’s sort of like naming a farmyard chicken or cow that you’re later going to eat for dinner.

Professional distance is the sensible advice one is given.

But, I’ve never been one for sensible advice.  Even though, I have discovered that naming a car can be more than slightly dangerous to my heart, in case they happen to be lost in a fire.

Still, I persist.  And now, I need your help.

First, a little background:

Naming our 1973 Beetle was easy:  it was yellow and white and daisies are my favourite flower.

My beetle

Such a cutie. Gone to the great motorway in the sky.

Said beloved car, lost in fire last November 24th.  Slight pause for tissues here…

Okay, I’m back.

Our 1974 Boler travel trailer had an obvious in-memoriam-inspired name because it was purchased with the help of our Grandma Helen.

Boler

Still deciding on what colour to paint the exterior.

I’m pretty sure her spirit hangs out in the Boler when we’re not using it.

That makes me happy.

Another slight pause for tissues…

Our not-vintage, red, small SUV started off as “The Chariot of Fire” and got refined to “Harriet the Chariot” and now, simply shortened to “Harriet.”

Even Practical Man sometimes goes along with the naming of a practical vehicle.  Especially when an attack deer hit Harriet last year and we nearly lost her, even though she had saved our lives just the day before in a wilderness survival dilemma of mythic proportions.

I really should buy stock in tissues.

Now, to the subject of my dilemma:  our 1970 Fiat 500.

our fiat

Object in picture is (even) smaller than it appears!

I wanted to pick a name that fit its diminutive size, Italian origins and my lean to the whimsical.

I ended up with Thumbellina, like Hans Christian Andersen’s tiny fairy.  We spelled it deliberately wrong so we could use Bellina for everyday.

Bellina means approximately “small, cute, beauty”, in Italian.

But, now that the Fiat has been around for a while, it’s becoming more and more apparent that its name doesn’t quite suit.

Our 2013 Fiat 500 seems more like the Bellina of the family – small, cute, beautiful and BOSSY.  She’s got a raging case of “BEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEP!-you-have-had-your-seatbelt-off-for-exactly-2-seconds-BEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEP!-to-drive-up-the-driveway-with-the-mail-and-I-am-going-to-BEEEEEEEEEEEEEEP-until-you-put-it-back-on-BEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEP!”

Two fiats

2013 Fiat 500 (left) – The Bossy One

She just seems like a Bellina.

Bossy, bossy Bellina.

It even has alliteration, to which, you may remember, I am addicted.

For the 1970 Fiat, I’m leaning now towards Gnocchi.

It’s kind of shaped like a little gnocchi, isn’t it?  And, I l-o-o-o-o-ove gnocchi.  They’re like eating little pillows of heaven.

Rear view Fiat 500

Even though, I realize that’s not grammatically-correct Italian.  One car:  but “gnocchi” is plural.

Little pillow (singular) of heaven, then.

So cute.

Now, I’m befuddled.  Is it low-brow and tacky to change a car’s name after it’s already been anointed?

I don’t know how you parents, with babies to name, can possibly commit.  Should I:

  • Stick with Bellina?
  • Change to Gnocchi?
  • Or, or, or, what about Polkadot?

As long as you don’t suggest Cordelia, I’m taking votes.

Copyright Christine Fader, 2013.  Did you enjoy this post from A Vintage Life?    Share on Facebook       Tweet         You might also like my latest book.

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