I am not brave.

In fact, I’m fairly sure I can easily be classified as a bonafide ‘fraidy cat.

Cows scare me (all that eye rolling surely leads to stampeding or something ominous with their big teeth.)

Revolving doors give me pause (I do quite enough spinning on my own, thankyouverymuch.)

Even the letter “X” can cause a shiver (seems a bit pointy, at times.)

Stop snickering.

Like I said, I am not brave.  And I’m a diagnosed swoony, fainty type, so really, I should have been born last century or in a Jane Austen novel.

It’s as if I’m of another era, so maybe that’s why I find myself loving and buying antique vehicles.

Back of the boler, as it's rolling down the road.

They’re not easy or economical or practical (kind of like me).  But Practical Man loves me and I love them, so he overlooks these points.  Not to mention, spends hours and months fixing and maintaining them.

Meanwhile, I’m twirling, making flowery seat covers, and taking pictures of the cute-shaped hunks of metal (Beetle, Fiat) or fiberglass (Boler).  Tra-la-la!

Because, that’s what antique vehicles are for, right?

Stop snickering.

I used to have a 1973 Beetle.

My beetle - yellow and white

It didn’t look scary with its chubby shape and cheery yellow and white paint, but it terrified me at first.

You see, the rule is, if you’re a swoony, fainty type:  you can’t drive.

Probably a good rule.

But, I had finally got effective treatment and was allowed, after 15+ years, to get my driver’s license back.  I had to take my final driver’s test and parallel park and blah, blah, blah to get my full license but I am good at tests, so fairly shortly thereafter, we bought the Beetle.  But, my time behind the wheel of any car, let alone one with old car idiosyncrasies, had been very limited.

I remember driving the Beetle back to our house from where we purchased it (about 2.5 scary hours away).  My hands were sweaty, I found myself grinding the gears and shouting things into the wind out the sunroof (bad words don’t count if you shout them into the wind–or in German).  Practical Man drove behind me in the chase car, seemingly unfazed by my driving or bad, German words.  Meanwhile, I was having 17 heart attacks, especially when I accidentally ended up on the Big Fat Scary Speedy Highway.

I screamed the whole time I was trying to merge on to the highway with my 1600 cc engine (and basket of old/new driver insecurities).

Yippee!

Not exactly.

Fast forward 10 years and here I am again, nauseated, sweating and in full ‘fraidy cat mode.

The classic Fiat500 is soooo very cute.

Rear view Fiat 500

But, it makes a very, very expensive lawn ornament.  And, I don’t yet have my glassed-wall garage where I can admire the vehicles from the comfort of our living room.

Hence, the little Fiat must be driven.

Yikes.

Practical Man has been wrestling with the engine on it for a while now.  It got new stuff added by a mechanic and came back broken but, Practical Man used his superior problem solving skills and stick-toitiveness and problem solved and stuck to it until he got it working.

But, it was a false alarm until he used more of his superior problem solving skills and stick-tuitiveness (and possibly some Seafoam in the engine) and now, yes, it is really working.

Yippee!

Except…that means, ahem, I actually have to drive it.

Not just sew it fun seat covers and stuff to hang from the rear view mirror.

The flowery seat covers I made for my classic Fiat500

Gulp.

I went out this afternoon on a solo mission.  If that makes me sounds like an astronaut, it’s because I felt like one.

You see, it’s an old and very simple little car. (Not unlike its owner, actually.)

There is no glove compartment or radio or even a gas gauge.

Hedgehug has a very tiny engine (only 2 cylinders), standard transmission (with no synchromeshing so, you need to double-clutch between each gear when you shift), a manual starter lever, a manual choke, and a 1970 gearbox.

Good grief.

Today, I stuck to the country roads and took deep breaths and tried to calm the rapid, fluttery sensation around my heart.  I said nothing in German, but , there was some gear grinding and one stall, as Hedgehug and I tried to learn how to get along with each other.

There will be quite a few more of these days before I am brave enough to grind gears and stall it in the city.   Then, it will be October and time to put it away for the winter.  And come next May and Old Car Goes On The Road for the Summer Day, I’ll have to be brave all over again.

Honestly, it’s enough to make me faint.

Luckily, I take medication for that now.

Picture of Hedgehug in the garage, with flowery magnet on the hood

 

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