Today was all rusty and sweaty and full of (luckily, not too many) deer flies and one magnificent wild strawberry.

Yes indeedy, I love me a vintage junkyard.

Or, scrapyard, as Practical Man calls it.

Potato, Patahto.

car fan that looks like a flower

If you are like him and call a junkyard a scrapyard, be sure to convey the word with all the enthusiasm that Practical Man uses when he utters it.  My usually reserved, strong-silent type guy can barely contain his glee when it comes to scrapyards.  With those mere two syllables, he manages to morph into someone who looks and sounds exactly like a 7 year-old boy on Christmas Eve.

In other words, he kind of resembles…well, ME.

Minus a little of the tra-la-la.  But only just.

Not that I mind his enthusiasm for the world of auto wreckers.  I am a big fan of old-school scrapyards myself.

Y’know, like most women in their middle of ages.

Well, maybe not.

Anyhoo, ever since my favourite junkyard, Minakers, closed for business, I have been somewhat bereft.  Bereft of real-for-true, old-school junkyards, that is.

Minakers was even better than a regular junkyard because it had been around a long, long time and was chock-a-block with antique cars.  Wanderers there were hard pressed to find anything newer than about 1970.

It was scrapyard nirvana.

There were 1940s bread vans with trees growing through the engines.  Sedan deliveries and original Beetles and ’30s gangster cars with swoopy running boards.  I spent most of my time there running around, stumbling over thing-a-ma-bobs from 1953 and squealing, from one wreck to the next.

What?  You’ve never heard a grown woman squeal in a junk yard before?

Maybe that’s because you’ve only ever darkened the doors of a modern-day junkyard.  You know the kind (or maybe you don’t, in which case I’m here to help):  there is no “wandering” amid the wreckage.   You have to know what you want before you go in!  Then, they go and FETCH IT FOR YOU.

Junkyard Joy Stealers:  that’s what they are.  They rob you of every little bit of the tripping and squinting and dreaming and squealing.

There is no squealing in a modern-day junkyard.  Only safety vests and liability clauses and steel-toed boots.

And, people who call you “ma’am”.

It’s tragic, really.

But, we spotted what looked like an old-school, rural junkyard on a recent trip and today was the day to go and explore.   Our vintage Boler travel trailer could use a few bits and bobs and we have a derelict boat that needs a windscreen and who knows what other treasures we might find?

Yes indeedy, I love the smell of broken safety glass and grease in the mornings.

First, I put on my lucky socks.  It’s very important to have lucky socks on when you are wandering and tripping and squinting and squealing.

purple socks with pale purple polka dots

Also, some hole-y, derelict, work boots circa 1991, which I still happen to have for occasions such as this.

When we got there–to my very own version of Canada’s Wonderland–I said hello to my first love at the gate:

Rusty Toyota Land Cruiser

Toyota Land Cruiser – SWOON!

After I bid my first love a tearful goodbye, we went in.  We were armed with bug juice, hats, water (not nearly enough for a junkyard extravaganza, it turned out), a gigantic toolbox and an additional bag of tools (and some socket sets and a first aid kit that we left in the car “just in case”.)

I was with Practical Man, after all.  Who needs safety vests and liability clauses when I have him?

Soon enough, I found my second love:

rusty green truck

Soooo pretty, pretty.

And then, my third love:

Blue truck among the ruins

How can my second love compete with my third love?  Third love is really a Colin Firth kind of truck and you know you don’t find those trucks every old day of the week.  I think our vintage Boler travel trailer really needs a vintage truck companion, don’t you?  A Colin Firth kind of vintage truck companion (I hope I’m not getting above myself).

Then, there was a very exciting PILE.  You have to have a heart of stone, not to love a junkyard PILE.

pile of junkyard cars heaped high

We were looking for trailers so that we could source a screen door (to re-make into a teeny, tiny Boler-sized screen door) and maybe even some outside cubby doors.  There were lots and lots of cars.  There were only a few trailers and they were scattered far and wide through the junkyard.

All the better to ensure the tripping and wandering and dreaming and squealing.

There were fallen-down trees (this junkyard was kind of in a forest) and tall grass (all the better to hide lyme-disease carrying ticks in) and lots and lots of poison ivy.

But, there were also beautiful sparkles of broken safety glass:

sparkly broken safety glass on the ground

And lace-like patterns shining in the sun:

cracked glass

There were old soul vehicles:  the ones that rest quietly among the trees and grass, like silent guardians over a sacred place.

old truck among the trees

We finally settled on our donor vehicles and got to work.  Practical Man’s modern-day tools made short work of the harvesting of parts in this old-timey junkyard.  No aching wrists from manually unscrewing scores of rusted hardware.  Just a few short bursts from the cordless drill and we were victorious:  two cubby doors and an RV screen door for our Boler!

And in this place where beauty and ruin are best of friends, I found the unlikeliest of treasures:

wild strawberry

One succulent explosion of summertime flavour.

It’s strawberry season at the scrapyard.

Tra-la-la.

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